Assessment of Tumor Mutational Burden in Pediatric Tumors by Real-Life Whole-Exome Sequencing and In Silico Simulation of Targeted Gene Panels: How the Choice of Method Could Affect the Clinical Decision?

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Authors

PÁLOVÁ Hana KÝR Michal PÁL Karol MERTA Tomáš MÚDRY Peter POLÁŠKOVÁ Kristýna CATELA IVKOVIĆ Tina ADAMCOVÁ Soňa HORNAKOVA Tekla JEŽOVÁ Marta KŘEN Leoš ŠTĚRBA Jaroslav SLABÝ Ondřej

Year of publication 2020
Type Article in Periodical
Magazine / Source Cancers
MU Faculty or unit

Central European Institute of Technology

Citation
Web https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6694/12/1/230
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/cancers12010230
Keywords pediatric tumors; tumor mutational burden; TMB; whole-exome sequencing; gene panel sequencing; immune checkpoint inhibitors
Description Background: Tumor mutational burden (TMB) is an emerging genomic biomarker in cancer that has been associated with improved response to immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) in adult cancers. It was described that variability in TMB assessment is introduced by different laboratory techniques and various settings of bioinformatic pipelines. In pediatric oncology, no study has been published describing this variability so far. Methods: In our study, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES, both germline and somatic) and calculated TMB in 106 patients with high-risk/recurrent pediatric solid tumors of 28 distinct cancer types. Subsequently, we used WES data for TMB calculation using an in silico approach simulating two The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved/authorized comprehensive genomic panels for cancer. Results: We describe a strong correlation between WES-based and panel-based TMBs; however, we show that this high correlation is significantly affected by inclusion of only a few hypermutated cases. In the series of nine cases, we determined TMB in two sequentially collected tumor tissue specimens and observed an increase in TMB along with tumor progression. Furthermore, we evaluated the extent to which potential ICI indication could be affected by variability in techniques and bioinformatic pipelines used for TMB assessment. We confirmed that this technological variability could significantly affect ICI indication in pediatric cancer patients; however, this significance decreases with the increasing cut-off values. Conclusions: For the first time in pediatric oncology, we assessed the reliability of TMB estimation across multiple pediatric cancer types using real-life WES and in silico analysis of two major targeted gene panels and confirmed a significant technological variability to be introduced by different laboratory techniques and various settings of bioinformatic pipelines.
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